Nintendo World

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Nintendo World (Japanese: 任天堂スペースワールド), formally known as Nintendo Space World (Japanese: にんてんどうスペースワールド) is a video game trade show historically hosted near Tokyo and Kyoto in Japan. The first event was held in 1989, under a different name. One of the first notable events was the 1995 Shoshinkai (初心会) show, in which the Nintendo 64, previously known as the "Ultra 64" was officially revealed to the public with prototypes of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (Zelda 64) and Super Mario 64. The last "Nintendo Space World" event occurred in 2001, revealing the Dolphin (Nintendo GameCube) and showcasing the Game Boy Advance. However in 2006, the event was continued under the name "Nintendo World". The latest "Nintendo World" event run from January 8th until January 10th 2011.

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Nintendo Space World 2000

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See also: Densetsu no Starfy (GBC)

The Nintendo Space World 2000 event was hosted at the Makuhari Messe (Japanese:幕張メッセ) exhibition centre, near Tokyo, Japan on August 25, 2000.[1] At the Nintendo Space World 2000 event, Densetsu no Starfy was showcased as a tentative title for the Game Boy Color. According to IGN, there were playable demos of the prototype, but there was a five minute time-limit until the game was reset in order to limit the player's progression. The game was scheduled for a release date of December 2000. The game still had a few pre-production items in place, including a debug menu.[2] There were a number of visible changes from the final game. The names of characters were changed, for example Moe was referred to as キョロロン (Kyororon) rather than キョロスケ (Kyorosuke), as he is referred to in the final game. Coins also replaced Pearls. The game used a different logo, which was carried on to the Nintendo Space World 2001 prototype. The sprites of characters and enemies are considerably less detailed in the demo than the final game, due to the limited graphical capabilities of the Game Boy Color, and the official character artwork has changed throughout the development of Densetsu no Starfy.

Additionally, a trailer was shown at this event advertising the upcoming Densetsu no Starfy. Footage from the event is still available in the form of a QuickTime movie on Nintendo of Japan's website on a page about Densetsu no Starfy when it was still a tentative Game Boy Color title, years after the Nintendo Space World 2000 event had finished. Differences from the prototype are still visible on the website.


Densetsu no Starfy trailer at Nintendo Space World (2000) filmed by Donald Allen of the defunct website NintendoNation (formally NintendoNext)
Official Nintendo website footage

Nintendo Space World 2001

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Playable Densetsu no Starfy demo stations at the Nintendo Spaceworld 2001 event

The Nintendo Space World 2001 event was hosted at the same location as the Nintendo Space World 2000 event, at the Makuhari Messe (Japanese:幕張メッセ) exhibition centre, near Tokyo, Japan. The event ran from 24th August 2001. [3] At the time of the event, Densetsu no Starfy had already made the transition from a Game Boy Color title into a Game Boy Advance title, and was said to be 60% complete. The game was rescheduled for a release date of January 2002 in Japan, although the final product was not released until September 6, 2002. [4] Before the release of the Game Boy Advance, Nintendo had encouraged developers to work on games for the upcoming console, as opposed to the Game Boy Color. This was also the cause of the development of two other Game Boy Color games, Tomato Adventure (then known as Gimmick Land) and the canceled Game Boy Music (which eventually became Daigasso! Band Brothers for the Nintendo DS) to move on to Game Boy Advance.

This prototype Densetsu no Starfy was also playable at Nintendo Space World 2001 via Game Boy Advance demo stations, along with games such as Fire Emblem: Fuuin no Tsurugi and the canceled Game Boy Advance game Luna Blaze. Compared with the original Game Boy Color prototype, the dialogue texts were made larger and easier to read, but the game still kept its tentative logo.[5]


External links

References

  1. Nintendo Spaceworld 2000 (in Japanese)
  2. Space World 2000: Hands On The Legend of Stafi - GameSpot.com
  3. Nintendo Spaceworld 2001 (in Japanese)
  4. Space World 2001: Hands-on The Legend of Stafi- GameSpot.com
  5. Game.Watch Nintendo Space World 2001 report
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